Building description essay

Collecting and defining vocabulary terms from the text will assist students in understanding words that otherwise may interrupt their reading.

Building description essay

After you have completed the body of your paper, you can decide what you want to say in your introduction and in your conclusion. Explanation Once you know what you want to talk about and you have written your thesis statement, you are ready to build the body of your essay.

The thesis statement will usually be followed by: The "examples or evidence" stage is the most important part of the paper, because you are giving your reader a clear idea of what you think and why you think it.

Read your thesis sentence over and ask yourself what questions a reader might ask about it. Then answer those questions, explaining and giving examples or evidence. Show how one thing is similar to another, and then how the two are different, emphasizing the side that seems more important to you.

For example, if your thesis states, "Jazz is a serious art form," you might compare and contrast a jazz composition to a classical one. Show your reader what the opposition thinks reasons why some people do not agree with your thesisand then refute those reasons show why they are wrong.

Think about the order in which you have made your points. Keep revisiting your thesis with three questions in mind: Does each paragraph develop my thesis?

Have I done all the development I wish had been done? Am I still satisfied with my working thesis, or have I developed my body in ways that mean I must adjust my thesis to fit what I have learned, what I believe, and what I have actually discussed?

Linking Paragraphs It is important to link your paragraphs together, giving your readers cues so that they see the relationship between one idea and the next, and how these ideas develop your thesis.

Your goal is a smooth transition from paragraph A to paragraph B, which explains why cue words that link paragraphs are often called "transitions. Your link between paragraphs may not be one word, but several, or even a whole sentence.

Here are some ways of linking paragraphs. The goals of an introduction are to: You already know why you are writing, and who your reader is; now present that reason for writing to that reader.

Hints for writing your introduction: Use the Ws of journalism who, what, when, where, why to decide what information to give. Why why is this paper worth reading? The answer could be that your topic is new, controversial or very important. For example, a paper could start, "It is less than a 32nd of an inch long, but it can kill an adult human," to begin a paper about eliminating malaria-carrying mosquitoes.

Conclusions There can be many different conclusions to the same paper just as there can be many introductionsdepending on who your readers are and where you want to direct them follow-up you expect of them after they finish your paper. Therefore, restating your thesis and summarizing the main points of your body should not be all that your conclusion does.

In fact, most weak conclusions are merely restatements of the thesis and summaries of the body without guiding the reader toward thinking about the implications of the thesis.

Here are some options for writing a strong conclusion: Make a prediction about the future. If your readers now understand that multicultural education has great advantages, or disadvantages, or both, whatever your opinion might be, what should they do?

An Essay on the Slavery and Commerce of the Human Species - Online Library of Liberty

Whom should they contact? Put your topic in a larger context. Just as in finding your topic and in forming your thesis, the safe and sane rule in writing a conclusion is: Revising and Proofreading the Draft Writing is only half the job of writing.

The writing process begins even before you put pen to paper, when you think about your topic.

How to Write an Essay - Examples of Good and Bad Writing

And, once you finish actually writing, the process continues. Revision is global, taking another look at what ideas you have included in your paper and how they are arranged; Proofreading Proofreading is checking over a draft to make sure that everything is complete and correct as far as spelling, grammar, sentence structure, punctuation and other such matters go.

Proofreading is polishing, one spot at a time.

Building description essay

Revision should come before proofreading: Hints for revising and proofreading: Leave some time -- an hour, a day, several days -- between writing and revising. You need some distance to switch from writer to editor, some distance between your initial vision and your re-vision.

You need to get your eye and your ear to work together.Architectural Description Template When writing an architectural description, it is important to focus on the construction, form, features, and finishes that exist today, rather than a building’s historic appearance.

Online Library of Liberty. A collection of scholarly works about individual liberty and free markets. A project of Liberty Fund, Inc. Sep 13,  · How to Write About Yourself.

In this Article: Article Summary Examples Writing of the Autobiographical Nature Writing Personal Essays for School Writing a Cover Letter for an Application Writing a Short Biography Note Community Q&A Writing about yourself can seem embarrassing at first.

Cover letters, personal essays, and bio notes about yourself come with some specific tricks and tips . A descriptive essay is a form of academic writing that is built around a detailed description of a person, building, place, situation, notion, etc.

An introductory paragraph: On March 4, , John Smith was born to Anna Bradcock Smith and James Smith. Although certainly not of humble origins, John was acquainted with several prominent and influential men of politics with whom he discussed matters .

Clauses: the Essential Building-Blocks of English Sentences.

Building description essay

Dependent Clauses. Dependent Clauses cannot stand by themselves and make good sense. They must be combined with an independent clause so that they become part of a sentence that can stand by itself.

Clauses: the Essential Building-Blocks